Resources

Resources and Forms

411Taxes.com is very pleased to offer you some valuable tax resources to help with most tax situations. Also some for general business and personal support for most financial situations. Feel free to use these resources to help figure out any concerns or questions you may have. Remember also that we are here to provide support for you if needed.

FAQ's

Business Expenses

Employees
Includes expenses for your job for which you weren’t reimbursed, but you only get the amount in excess of 2% of your AGI (adjusted gross income), and only if you can itemize. For instance, if your AGI is $100,000, you must have at least $2,000 in employee business expenses before you will begin to benefit from the deduction.

Self-Employed:
You are allowed to deduct most business expenses in full.

See IRS Publication 535 for more information.

Advertising and Promotion Expenses (Self-employed)

Books and Publications

  • Books, trade journals, newspapers and publications for your trade or profession

Dues and Fees:

  • Dues to a professional organization for people in your profession
  • Union dues, initiation fees, and assessments for benefit payments to unemployed union members.
  • Regulatory fees for your profession
  • Dues to chambers of commerce and similar organizations if the membership helps you carry out your job duties (see exceptions).
  • Licenses paid to state or local governments

Education and Research

  • Educational expenses related to your present work that maintains or improves your skills.
  • Research expenses

Equipment and Supplies

  • Business use of computer. Employees: Must be for the convenience of your employer and required as a condition of your employment.
  • Supplies and tools you use in your work

Home Office

  • Expenses for an office in your home IF part of the home is used regularly and exclusively for your work. Employees: the use of your home office must also be for the convenience of your employer.
  • For more information, see IRS Publication 587

Internet

  • Employees: Must be for the convenience of your employer and required as a condition of your employment.

Job hunting expenses (Employees)

To deduct job hunting expenses, you must be looking for a job in your present line of work (i.e., you’re not changing professions or looking for your first job). Expenses include:

  • Resume preparation (drafting, typing, printing, mailing, faxing)
  • Employment agency fees
  • Executive recruiters’ fees
  • Portfolio preparation costs
  • Career counseling to assist you in improving your position
  • Legal and accounting fees you pay in connection with employment contract negotiations and preparation
  • Advertising
  • Transportation costs to job interviews
  • Long distance calls to prospective employers
  • Newspapers you purchase to read the employment ads
  • Other business publications you purchase to read the employment ads
  • Half of your meals you pay for that are directly related to your job search
  • If you take a trip away from home to look for a new job, your expenses for traveling, lodging, meals (50% of the cost), etc. are deductible only if the primary purpose of your trip is to look for a job. To substantiate the purpose of your trip, keep a daily log of your interviews, application efforts, etc.

Meals and Entertainment

  • Meals and entertaining costs with a clear business purpose (i.e., meeting with clients) (only 50% of the cost is deductible). Keep a record of the date, place, amount of expenses, people present, business purpose, and business discussed. Also keep receipts for expenses in excess of $75.
  • For more information, see IRS Publication 463

Telephone Charges

  • Business use of cellular phone
  • Cost of long-distance business calls charged to home phone
  • Separate business telephone (home phone line is not deductible)

Travel and Transportation

  • Traveling costs incurred while away from home on business
  • Traveling costs paid in connection with a temporary work assignment
  • Transportation between your home and a temporary work location if you have no regular place of work but you ordinarily work in the metropolitan area where you live and the temporary work location is outside that area
  • Transportation between your home and a temporary work location if you have at least one regular workplace for this employment. It doesn’t matter how far away the temporary location is in this case.
  • Transportation from one job to another if you work two places in one day
  • If you are self-employed and your home is your principal place of business, all business travel is deductible.
  • For more information, see IRS Publication 463

Uniforms and Gear

  • Protective clothing and gear
  • Uniforms (except if you’re full-time active duty in the armed forces)
  • Dry cleaning costs for your uniforms or protective clothing (not for your everyday clothing, though)
  • Specialized clothing designed for your job, as long as it’s not suitable for everyday wear
  • Safety equipment, such as hard hats, safety glasses, safety boots, and gloves

Miscellaneous

  • Gifts, but only up to $25 per recipient
  • Passport for business travel
  • Postage
  • Office supplies
    • Printing and copying
    • Legal and professional services (tax preparation fee)
    • Medical exams required by your employer
    • Occupational taxes if they’re charged at a flat rate by your city or other local government for the privilege of working in that area
    • Business liability insurance premiums
    • Job dismissal insurance premiums
    • Damages you pay to a former employer for a breach of employment contract
    • Employee contributions to state disability funds

    Self-Employed Only

    • Interest on business loans
    • Self-Employed health insurance (partial)
    • Commissions and fees
    • Business insurance
    • Keogh or SEP contributions
    • Rental of business property
    • Office rent and utilities
    • Repairs and maintenance
    • Business taxes and licenses
Expenses You Cannot Deduct

People commonly hope to deduct some of the following expenses, but unfortunately they are not deductible.

Non-Deductible Expenses:

  • Expenses that were reimbursed by your employer.
  • Apartment rent, unless qualified to claim away from home expenses for a business trip expected to last one year or less (Temporary Living Expenses), or if a portion is used as a home office (special rules apply to both cases). Also, may be deductible if maintained for the sole purpose of going to school if your education expenses qualify for the business deduction.
  • Clothing that is adaptable to everyday wear (this includes suits, evening wear, etc.).
  • Commuting costs (subways and rail fares, and vehicle use including tolls, gasoline, and parking). Exception if qualified as being away from home on business or as part of Temporary Living Expenses.
  • Dues to country clubs, golf and athletic clubs, and airline and hotel clubs.
  • Home phone line
  • Job hunting expenses if you’re looking for your first job, or changing professions.
  • Dry cleaning and laundry (unless you’re on a business trip)
  • Legal fees and closing costs involved in purchasing a property
  • Fees for taking an exam to qualify you in a profession (e.g., Bar Exam, GRE, etc.)
  • Immigration visa expenses, such as for obtaining a Green Card or H-1B visa.
  • Moving expenses that were not associated with your job and were less than 50 miles.
  • Moving expenses if you are claiming temporary living expenses.
  • Meals, unless for business meetings, or while away from home on business. Also, allowable as part of Temporary Living Expenses.
  • Lunch on the job.
  • Personal expenses, such as grooming and maintenance (gym membership) unless they are directly related to your business (e.g., models, actors).
  • Any other personal expenses for which there is no provision for a deduction in the Tax Code.
  • Interest on personal loans.
  • Support of family members, unless they qualify as your dependents.
  • Personal vacations.
  • Cosmetic surgery to improve personal appearance
  • Contributions made to individuals or foreign charities.
  • Student loan interest if adjusted gross income is greater than $75,000 (single) or $150,000 (married).
  • Student loan principal.

Temporary Living Expenses

 

  • What are temporary living expenses? Temporary living expenses are travel expenses incurred during an extended business trip or temporary work assignment that was intended to last one year or less. The expenses may only be claimed for a stay for business. Personal or school stay expenses generally are not deductible. Temporary living expenses also have no relation to having alien status. A U.S. citizen working temporarily in another city can also claim them. However, the time limitation of the visa makes it easier for a foreigner to claim that he is “away from home” on a business trip if he intends to work in the new location for less than a year. Temporary living expenses include hotel lodging (or apartment rent for longer stays), meals, and local transportation. Meals may be estimated using federal per diem rates. For example, the IRS allows $46 per day for a high cost locality (e.g., New York City). On the tax return, temporary living expenses are deducted as unreimbursed employee business expenses.
  • What are the rules for taking temporary living expenses?
    1. A person must be working at a location on a temporary assignment (defined below); and
    2. A person’s tax home (defined below) must be in a foreign country, or in another state beyond commuting distance.
  • Temporary Assignment: The IRS states that if you expect your employment away from home in a single location to last, and it does last, for 1 year or less, it is temporary unless facts and circumstances indicate otherwise. If you expect it to last for more than 1 year, it is indefinite. However, if you expect your employment away from home to last for 1 year or less, but at some later date you expect it to last longer than 1 year, it is temporary (in the absence of facts and circumstances indicating otherwise) until your expectation changes. Starting with the date your expectation changes, travel expenses will no longer be deductible. (IRS Publication 54, page 12). What determines a temporary versus an indefinite assignment is the intent of the taxpayer. If assignment contracts can be made to last a year or less, this makes it much easier to document and support the position that your job was temporary in the uncommon event of an audit (see below).
  • Tax Home: The IRS defines your tax home as the general area of your main place of business, employment, or post of duty, regardless of where you maintain your family home. In addition, the IRS states that your tax home is the place where you are permanently or indefinitely engaged to work as an employee or self-employed individual. If you are not a U.S. citizen or Green Card holder and you claim temporary living expenses, you will be asserting that your tax home is in your home country, and not in the U.S. because your stay is limited to the length of your visa. Since you have no regular place of work (the U.S. assignment is only for a limited period), your regular place of abode (where you normally live) is your tax home.
  • Does being present in the U.S. before working (e.g., as a student) cause the U.S. to be my tax home?
    No, as a student your tax home would still be where you last worked. If you didn’t work before, it will be your permanent home (e.g., parent’s home). However, if you start working in the U.S., the IRS may presume the U.S. to be your tax home, since you did not establish a career in your home country. The rebuttal could be that the U.S. cannot be your tax home since it would have to be your regular place of business. Since you are limited by the length of your visa, it is not possible for the U.S. business to be “regular.”
  • Chance of audit: Temporary living expenses are treated as unreimbursed employee business expenses on your tax return. You are more at risk for being audited on the temporary living expense deduction if your expenses are high relative to income. This would be the case if your rent is very high relative to income, and/or if you are claiming other large business expenses such as tuition. Nevertheless, chance of audit remains low. I have only had one client audited. A few other clients were disallowed the expense automatically without audit, and additional tax was taken out of their refunds.
  • Substantiating temporary living expenses, if audited: Documentation is critical to support the position that an assignment is expected to last less than a year, especially when the assignment is later extended. An assignment letter stating the employee’s temporary job location and expected assignment duration should be sufficient if done contemporaneously with the start of the assignment. If you are audited and the IRS decides to disallow your claim for temporary living expenses, you will be assessed interest at the prevailing rate from the date you filed or the due date of the return, which is later, plus late payment penalties of 1/2% of the balance due per month.
Miscellaneous Schedule A Expenses

Medical Expenses

Generally, you can only deduct the excess over 7.5% of Adjusted Gross Income, and then only if you can itemize on Schedule A. This means that if you make $100,000, you can only deduct the amount of medical expenses you spent over $7,500. Please also refer to IRS Publication 502: Medical Expenses.

  • Acupuncture
  • Air conditioner necessary for relief from allergies or other respiratory problems
  • Alcoholism treatment
  • Analysis
  • Artificial limbs
  • Artificial teeth
  • Birth control pills prescribed by a Doctor
  • Printing and copying
  • Legal and professional services (tax preparation fee)
  • Medical exams required by your employer
  • Occupational taxes if they’re charged at a flat rate by your city or other local government for the privilege of working in that area
  • Business liability insurance premiums
  • Job dismissal insurance premiums
  • Damages you pay to a former employer for a breach of employment contract
  • Employee contributions to state disability funds
  • Self-Employed Only
    • Interest on business loans
    • Self-Employed health insurance (partial
    • Commissions and fees
    • Business insurance
    • Keogh or SEP contributions
    • Rental of business property
    • Office rent and utilities
    • Repairs and maintenance
    • Business taxes and licenses

Financial Calculators

Automobile
Cash Flow
College
Credit
Home & Mortgage
Insurance
Paycheck & Benefits
Qualified Plans
Retirement
Savings
Taxes

Record Retention Guide

How Long To Keep Tax Records

You must keep your records as long as they may be needed for the administration of any provision of the Internal Revenue Code. Generally, this means you must keep records that support items shown on your return until the period of limitations for that return runs out.

The period of limitations is the period of time in which you can amend your return to claim a credit or refund or the IRS can assess additional tax. Table 3 contains the periods of limitations that apply to income tax returns. Unless otherwise stated, the years refer to the period beginning after the return was filed. Returns filed before the due date are treated as being filed on the due date.

Table 3. Period of Limitations

IF you… THEN the period is…
1 Owe additional tax and (2), (3), and (4) do not apply to you 3 years
2 Do not report income that you should and it is more than 25% of the gross income shown on your return 6 years
3 File a fraudulent return No limit
4 Do not file a return No limit
5 File a claim for credit or refund after you filed your return The later of 3 years or 2 years after tax was paid.
6 File a claim for a loss from worthless securities 7 years

Property: Keep records relating to property until the period of limitations expires for the year in which you dispose of the property in a taxable disposition. You must keep these records to figure your basis for computing gain or loss when you sell or otherwise dispose of the property.

Generally, if you received property in a nontaxable exchange, your basis in that property is the same as the basis of the property you gave up. You must keep the records on the old property, as well as the new property, until the period of limitations expires for the year in which you dispose of the new property in a taxable disposition.

Keeping records for nontax purposes: When your records are no longer needed for tax purposes, do not discard them until you check to see if they should be kept longer for other purposes. Your insurance company or creditors may require you to keep certain records longer than the IRS does.

Why Keep Records?

There are many reasons to keep records. In addition to tax purposes, you may need to keep records for insurance purposes or for getting a loan. Good records will help you:

  • Identify sources of income. You may receive money or property from a variety of sources. Your records can identify the sources of your income. You need this information to separate business from nonbusiness income and taxable from nontaxable income.
  • Keep track of expenses. You may forget an expense unless you record it when it occurs. You can use your records to identify expenses for which you can claim a deduction. This will help you determine if you can itemize deductions on your tax return.
  • Keep track of the basis of property. You need to keep records that show the basis of your property. This includes the original cost or other basis of the property and any improvements you made.
  • Prepare tax returns. You need records to prepare your tax return. Good records help you to file quickly and accurately.
  • Support items reported on tax returns. You must keep records in case the IRS has a question about an item on your return. If the IRS examines your tax return, you may be asked to explain the items reported. Good records will help you explain any item and arrive at the correct tax with a minimum of effort. If you do not have records, you may have to spend time getting statements and receipts from various sources. If you cannot produce the correct documents, you may have to pay additional tax and be subject to penalties.
Kinds of Records To Keep

Basic records

Basic records are documents that everybody should keep. These are the records that prove your income and expenses. If you own a home or investments, your basic records should contain documents related to those items. Table 1 lists documents you should keep as basic records. Following Table 1 are examples of information you can get from these records.

Table 1. Proof of Income and Expense

FOR items concerning your… KEEP as basic records…
Income
  • Form(s) W-2
  • Form(s) 1099
  • Bank statements
  • Brokerage statements
  • Form(s) K-1
Expenses
  • Sales slips
  • Invoices
  • Receipts
  • Canceled checks or other proof of payment
  • Written communications from qualified charities
Home
  • Closing statements
  • Purchase and sales invoices
  • Proof of payment
  • Insurance records
  • Receipts for improvement costs
Investments
  • Brokerage statements
  • Mutual fund statements
  • Form(s) 1099
  • Form(s) 2439
Income

Your basic records prove the amounts you report as income on your tax return. Your income may include wages, dividends, interest, and partnership or S corporation distributions. Your records also can prove that certain amounts are not taxable, such as tax-exempt interest.

Note: If you receive a Form W-2, keep Copy C until you begin receiving social security benefits. This will help protect your benefits in case there is a question about your work record or earnings in a particular year. Review the information shown on your annual (for workers over age 25) Social Security Statement.

Expenses

Your basic records prove the expenses for which you claim a deduction (or credit) on your tax return. Your deductions may include alimony, charitable contributions, mortgage interest, and real estate taxes. You also may have child care expenses for which you can claim a credit.

Home

Your basic records should enable you to determine the basis or adjusted basis of your home. You need this information to determine if you have a gain or loss when you sell your home or to figure depreciation if you use part of your home for business purposes or for rent. Your records should show the purchase price, settlement or closing costs, and the cost of any improvements. They also may show any casualty losses deducted and insurance reimbursements for casualty losses. Your records also should include a copy of Form 2119, Sale of Your Home, if you sold your previous home before May 7, 1997, and postponed tax on the gain from that sale.

When you sell your home, your records should show the sales price and any selling expenses, such as commissions.

Investments

Your basic records should enable you to determine your basis in an investment and whether you have a gain or loss when you sell it. Investments include stocks, bonds, and mutual funds. Your records should show the purchase price, sales price, and commissions. They may also show any reinvested dividends, stock splits and dividends, load charges, and original issue discount (OID).

Proof of Payment

One of your basic records is proof of payment. You should keep these records to support certain amounts shown on your tax return. Proof of payment alone is not proof that the item claimed on your return is allowable. You also should keep other documents that will help prove that the item is allowable.

Generally, you prove payment with a cash receipt, financial account statement, credit card statement, canceled check, or substitute check. If you make payments in cash, you should get a dated and signed receipt showing the amount and the reason for the payment.

If you make payments by electronic funds transfer, you may be able to prove payment with an account statement.

Table 2. Proof of Payment

IF payment is by… THEN the statement must show the…
Cash
  • Amount
  • Payee’s name
  • Transaction date
Check
  • Check number
  • Amount
  • Payee’s name
  • Date the check amount was posted to the account by the financial institution
Debit or credit card
  • Amount charged
  • Payee’s name
  • Transaction date
Electronic funds transfer
  • Amount transferred
  • Payee’s name
  • Date the transfer was posted to the account by the financial institution
Payroll deduction
  • Amount
  • Payee code
  • Transaction date

Account statements: You may be able to prove payment with a legible financial account statement prepared by your bank or other financial institution. These statements are accepted as proof of payment if they show the items reflected in Table 2.

Pay statements: You may have deductible expenses withheld from your paycheck, such as union dues or medical insurance premiums. You should keep your year-end or final pay statements as proof of payment of these expenses.

Specific Records

Alimony

If you receive or pay alimony, you should keep a copy of your written separation agreement or the divorce, separate maintenance, or support decree. If you pay alimony, you also will need to know your former spouse’s social security number.

Business Use of Your Home

You may be able to deduct certain expenses connected with the business use of your home. You should keep records that show the part of your home that you use for business and the expenses related to that use.

Casualty and Theft Losses

To deduct a casualty or theft loss, you must be able to prove that you had a casualty or theft. Your records also must be able to support the amount you claim.

For a casualty loss, your records should show:

  • The type of casualty (car accident, fire, storm, etc.) and when it occurred,
  • That the loss was a direct result of the casualty, and
  • That you were the owner of the property.

For a theft loss, your records should show:

  • When you discovered your property was missing,
  • That your property was stolen, and
  • That you were the owner of the property.
Child Care Credit

You must give the name, address, and taxpayer identification number for all persons or organizations that provide care for your child or dependent. You can use Form W-10, Dependent Care Provider’s Identification and Certification, or various other sources to get the information from the care provider. Keep this information with your tax records.

Contributions

You must keep records to prove the contributions you make during the year. The kinds of records depend on whether the contribution is cash, noncash, or out-of-pocket expenses. For information on contributions and the records you must keep, see Publication 526, Charitable Contributions.

Credit for the Elderly or the Disabled

If you are under age 65, you must have your physician complete a statement certifying that you were permanently and totally disabled on the date you retired.

You do not have to file this statement with your Form 1040 or Form 1040A, but you must keep it for your records.

If the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) certifies that you are permanently and totally disabled, you can substitute VA Form 21-0172, Certification of Permanent and Total Disability, for the physician’s statement you are required to keep.

Education Expenses

If you have the records to prove your expenses, you may be entitled to claim certain tax benefits for your education expenses. You may qualify to exclude from income items such as a qualified scholarship, interest on U.S. savings bonds, or reimbursement from your employer. You also may qualify for certain credits or deductions. You should keep documents, such as transcripts or course descriptions, that show periods of enrollment and canceled checks and receipts that verify amounts you spent on tuition, books, and other educational expenses.

Exemptions

If you are claiming an exemption for your spouse or a dependent (a qualifying child or a qualifying relative), you must keep records that support the deduction.

Employee Business Expenses

If you have employee business expenses, see Publication 463, Travel, Entertainment, Gift, and Car Expenses, for a discussion of what records to keep.

Energy Incentives

If you want to claim one of the tax incentives for the purchase of energy-efficient products, you must keep records to prove:

  • When and how you acquired the property,
  • The purchase price of the property, and
  • That the property qualified for the credit.

The following documents may show this information.

  • Purchase and sales invoices.
  • Manufacturer’s certification statement.
  • Canceled checks.
Gambling Winnings and Losses

You must keep an accurate diary of your winnings and losses that includes the:

  • Date and type of gambling activity,
  • Name and address or location of the gambling establishment,
  • Names of other persons present with you at the gambling establishment, and
  • Amount you won or lost.
Health Savings Account (HSA) and Medical Savings Account (MSA)

For each qualified medical expense you pay with a distribution from your HSA or MSA, you must keep a record of the name and address of each person you paid and the amount and date of the payment.

Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs)

Keep copies of the following forms and records until all distributions are made from your IRA(s).

Form 5498, IRA Contribution Information, or similar statement received for each year showing contributions you made, distributions you received, and the value of your IRA(s).

Form 1099-R, Distributions From Pensions, Annuities, Retirement or Profit-Sharing Plans, IRAs, Insurance Contracts, etc., received for each year you received a distribution.

Form 8606, Nondeductible IRAs, for each year you made a nondeductible contribution to your IRA or received distributions from an IRA if you ever made nondeductible contributions.

For a worksheet you can use to keep a record of yearly contributions and distributions, see Publication 590, Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs).

Medical and Dental Expenses

In addition to records you keep of regular medical expenses, you should keep records of transportation expenses that are primarily for and essential to medical care. You can record these expenses in a diary. You should record gas and oil expenses directly related to that transportation. If you do not want to keep records of your actual expenses, you can keep a log of the miles you drive your car for medical purposes and use the standard mileage rate. You should also keep records of any parking fees, tolls, taxi fares, and bus fares.

For information on medical expenses and the standard mileage rate, see Publication 502, Medical and Dental Expenses (Including the Health Coverage Tax Credit).

Mortgage Interest

If you paid mortgage interest of $600 or more, you should receive Form 1098, Mortgage Interest Statement. Keep this form and your mortgage statement and loan information in your records. For information on mortgage interest, see Publication 936, Home Mortgage Interest Deduction.

Moving Expenses

You may be able to deduct qualified moving expenses that are not reimbursed. For more information on what expenses qualify and what records you need, see Publication 521, Moving Expenses.

Pensions and Annuities

Use the worksheet in your tax return instructions to figure the taxable part of your pension or annuity. Keep a copy of the completed worksheet until you fully recover your contributions. For information on pensions and annuities, see Publication 575, Pension and Annuity Income, or Publication 721, Tax Guide to U.S. Civil Service Retirement Benefits.

Taxes

Form(s) W-2 and Form(s) 1099-R show state income tax withheld from your wages and pensions. You should keep a copy of these forms to prove the amount of state withholding. If you made estimated state income tax payments, you need to keep a copy of the form or your check(s).

You also need to keep copies of your state income tax returns. If you received a refund of state income taxes, the state may send you Form 1099-G, Certain Government Payments.

Keep mortgage statements, tax assessments, or other documents as records of the real estate and personal property taxes you paid.

If you deducted actual state and local general sales taxes instead of using the optional state sales tax tables, you must keep your actual receipts showing general sales taxes paid.

Tips

You must keep a daily record to accurately report your tips on your return. You can use Form 4070A, Employee’s Daily Record of Tips, which is found in Publication 1244, Employee’s Daily Record of Tips and Report to Employer, to record your tips.

Tax Rates

2016 Tax Rates

Single

If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
$0 to $9,275 10% of taxable income
$9,275 to $37,650 $927.50 + 15% of the amount over $9,275
$37,650 to $91,150 $5,183.75 + 25% of the amount over $37,650
$91,150 to $190,150 $18,558.75 + 28% of the amount over $91,150
$190,150 to $413,350 $46,278.75 + 33% of the amount over $190,150
$413,350 to $415,050 $119,934.75 + 35% of the amount over $413,350
Over $415,050 $120,529.75 + 39.6% of the amount over $415,050

Head of Household

If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
$0 to $13,250 10% of taxable income
$13,250 to $50,400 $1,325 + 15% of the amount over $13,250
$50,400 to $130,150 $6,897.50 + 25% of the amount over $50,400
$130,150 to $210,800 $26,835 + 28% of the amount over $130,150
$210,800 to $413,350 $49,417 + 33% of the amount over $210,800
$413,350 to $441,000 $116,258.50 + 35% of the amount over $413,350
Over $441,000 $125,936 + 39.6% of the amount over $441,000

Married Filing Jointly

If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
$0 to $18,550 10% of taxable income
$18,550 to $75,300 $1,855 + 15% of the amount over $18,550
$75,300 to $151,900 $10,367.50 + 25% of the amount over $75,300
$151,900 to $231,450 $29,517.50 + 28% of the amount over $151,900
$231,450 to $413,350 $51,791.50 + 33% of the amount over $231,450
$413,350 to $466,950 $111,818.50 + 35% of the amount over $413,350
Over $466,950 $130,578.50 + 39.6% of the amount over $466,950

Married Filing Separately

If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
$0 to $9,275 10% of taxable income
$9,275 to $37,650 $927.50 + 15% of the amount over $9,275
$37,650 to $75,950 $5,183.75 + 25% of the amount over $37,650
$75,950 to $115,725 $14,758.75 + 28% of the amount over $75,950
$115,725 to $206,675 $25,895.75 + 33% of the amount over $115,725
$206,675 to $233,475 $55,909.25 + 35% of the amount over $206,675
Over $233,475 $65,289.25 + 39.6% of the amount over $233,475

 

Standard Mileage Rate

Use Rate
Business 54 cents
Medical Care or Move 19 cents
Charitable 14 cents
2015 Tax Rates

Single

If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
$0 to $9,225 10% of taxable income
$9,225 to $37,450 $922.50 + 15% of the amount over $9,225
$37,450 to $90,750 $5,156.25 + 25% of the amount over $37,450
$90,750 to $189,300 $18,481.25 + 28% of the amount over $90,750
$189,300 to $411,500 $46,075.25 + 33% of the amount over $189,300
$411,500 to $413,200 $119,401.25 + 35% of the amount over $411,500
Over $413,200 $119,996.25 + 39.6% of the amount over $413,200

Head of Household

If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
$0 to $13,150 10% of taxable income
$13,150 to $50,200 $1,315 + 15% of the amount over $13,150
$50,200 to $129,600 $6,872.50 + 25% of the amount over $50,200
$129,600 to $209,850 $26,772.50 + 28% of the amount over $129,600
$209,850 to $411,500 $49,192.50 + 33% of the amount over $209,850
$411,500 to $439,000 $115,737 + 35% of the amount over $411,500
Over $439,000 $125,362 + 39.6% of the amount over $439,000

Married Filing Jointly

If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
$0 to $18,450 10% of taxable income
$18,450 to $74,900 $1,815 + 15% of the amount over $18,450
$74,900 to $151,200 $10,312.50 + 25% of the amount over $74,900
$151,200 to $230,450 $29,387.50 + 28% of the amount over $151,200
$230,450 to $411,500 $51,577.50 + 33% of the amount over $230,450
$411,500 to $464,850 $111,324 + 35% of the amount over $411,500
Over $464,850 $129,996.50 + 39.6% of the amount over $464,850

Married Filing Separately

If Taxable Income Is: The Tax Is:
$0 to $9,225 10% of taxable income
$9,225 to $37,450 $922.50 + 15% + 15% of the amount over $9,225
$37,450 to $75,600 $5,156.25 + 25% of the amount over $37,450
$75,600 to $115,225 $14,693.75 + 28% of the amount over $75,600
$115,225 to $205,750 $25,788.75 + 33% of the amount over $115,225
$205,750 to $232,425 $55,662 + 35% of the amount over $205,750
Over $232,425 $64,989.25 + 39.6% of the amount over $232,425

 

Standard Mileage Rate

Use Rate
Business 57.5 cents
Medical Care or Move 23 cents
Charitable 14 cents

Tax Due Dates

2017

2017 Tax Schedule

January

Tu 17 Pay the final installment of your 2016 estimated tax – use Form 1040-ES.

Tu 17 Farmers and fishermen: Pay your estimated tax for 2016. Use Form 1040-ES.

Tu 31 Individuals: File your tax return if you did not pay your last installment of estimated tax by Jan 17th (see Form 1040-ES)

Tu 31 File Form 1099-MISC with IRS if you are reporting nonemployee compensation in box 7, regardless of whether you file paper forms or electronically

Tu 31 File 2016 Forms W-2, W-2AS, W-2CM, W-2GU, W-2VI, W-3 and W-3SS with the SSA whether you file using paper forms or electronically.

Tu 31 Furnish Forms 1098, 1099 and W-2G to recipients for certain payments during 2016. Furnish Form W-2 to employees who worked for you during 2016.

Tu 31 File Forms 940, 941, 943, 944 and/or 945 if you did not deposit all taxes when due.

February

Fr 10 File Forms 940, 941, 943, 944 and/or 945 if you timely deposited all required payments.

We 15 File a new Form W-4 if you claimed exemption from income tax withholding in 2016.

We 15 Furnish Forms 1099-B, 1099-S and certain Forms 1099-MISC to recipients.

Th 16 Begin withholding on employees who claimed exemption from withholding in 2016 but did not file a W-4 or W-4(SP) to continue withholding exemption in 2017.

Tu 28 File Forms 1096, 1098, 1099 (except Form 1099-MISC reporting non-employee compensation), and W-2G if you file paper forms.

Tu 28 Applicable Large Employer: File paper Forms 1094-C and 1095-C; For all other providers file paper Forms 1094-B and 1095-B with the IRS

March

We 1 Farmers and fishermen: File Form 1040 and pay any tax due. However, you have until Apr 18 to file if you paid your 2016 estimated tax payments by Jan 17, 2017.

Th 2 Applicable Large Employers provide Forms 1095-C to full time employees; For all other providers of Minimum Essential Coverage, provide Forms 1095-B to responsible individuals.

We 15 S Corps: File Form 1120S for calendar year and pay any tax due. Give copy of Sch. K-1 to each shareholder. File Form 2553 to elect S Corp status beginning with calendar year 2017. For automatic 6-month extension, file Form 7004 and deposit estimated tax.

We 15 Partnerships: File Form 1065 for the calendar year and furnish a copy of Sch. K-1 to each partner. File Form 7004 for extension (see instructions).

We 15 Electing Large Partnerships: File Form 1065-B calendar year return. Furnish Sch. K-1 to each partner. File Form 7004 for extension (see instructions).

Fr 31 Electronically file Forms W-2, W-2G, 1098, 1099, 8027, 1094-C, 1095-C, 1094-B, and 1095-B.

April

Tu 18 Individuals: File Form 1040, 1040A, or 1040EZ. For automatic 6-month extension file Form 4868 and deposit estimated tax. Pay the first installment of 2017 estimated tax – Use Form 1040-ES.

Tu 18 Corporations: File Form 1120 for calendar year and pay any tax due. For automatic 5-month extension, file Form 7004 and deposit estimated tax.

Tu 18 Household Employers: File Sch. H with Form 1040 if you paid $2,000 or more to a household employee.

Tu 18 Corporations: Deposit the first installment of your 2017 estimated tax.

May

Mo 1 Employers: File Form 941 for the first quarter.

Mo 1 Deposit FUTA tax owed through Mar if more than $500.

We 10 File Form 941 for the first quarter if you timely deposited all required payments.

June

Th 15 Individuals living outside the U.S.: File Form 1040. For automatic 4 month extension file form 4868 and deposit estimated tax.

Th 15 Pay the second installment of 2017 estimated tax -Use Form 1040-ES.

Th 15 Corporations: Deposit the second installment of your 2017 estimated tax.

July

Mo 31 Deposit FUTA owed through June if more than $500.

Mo 31 File Form 941 for the second quarter.

August

Th 10 File Form 941 for the second quarter if you timely deposited all required payments.

Tu 15 Partnerships: File Form 1065 if you timely requested an extension.

September

Fr 15 Pay the third installment of your 2017 estimated tax – Use Form 1040-ES.

Fr 15 Corporations: File calendar year Form 1120 or 1120S if you timely requested a 5 or 6-month extension (see instructions).

Fr 15 Corporations: Deposit the third installment of your 2017 estimated tax.

Fr 15 Electing Large Partnerships: File Form 1065-B if you timely requested an extension.

October

Mo 16 Individuals: File Form 1040, 1040A, or 1040EZ if you timely requested a 6-month extension.

Tu 31 File Form 941 for the third quarter.

Tu 31 Deposit FUTA owed through Sep if more than $500.

November

Mo 13 File Form 941 for the third quarter if you timely deposited all required payments.

December

Fr 15 Corporations: Deposit the fourth installment of your 2017 estimated tax.

Where's My Refund?

Federal Refund
Track Your Federal Return
Federal Amended Return
Track Your Amended Federal Return
State Refund

Alabama

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

District of Columbia

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts (Account registration required to check refund status online)

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

New Hampshire (There is no online tool for tax refund status on the New Hampshire’s Department of Revenue website. Call 603-230-5920 for information.)

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

Tennessee (This state does not provide an online refund status tool. For information, call 800-342-1003 if within the state. From outside the state, call 615-253-0600.)

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

West Virginia

Wisconsin